ABOUT WINE
Wine is an alcoholic beverage made from the fermentation of unmodified grape juice. The natural chemical balance of grapes is such that they ferment completely without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes or other nutrients. Although other fruits like apples and berries can also be fermented, the resultant "wines" are normally named after the fruit (for example, apple wine or elderberry wine) and are generically known as fruit or country wine. The word "wine" derives from the Proto-Germanic winam, an early borrowing from the Latin vinum, "wine" or "(grape) vine", itself derived from the Proto-Indo-European stem win-o- (cf. Ancient Greek oînos). Similar words for wine or grapes are found in the Semitic languages and in Georgian (gvino), and the term is considered an ancient wanderwort.

OPENING A WINE BOTTLE
There are plenty of corkscrews loaded with bells and whistles out there, but don't fall for them: A simple, classic waiter's corkscrew - the type used in most restaurants - is really all you need. Here's how to use it properly.
Using the corkscrew’s knife (or a serrated knife), cut around the top of the bottle, right under the lip—turning the bottle as you go—to remove the foil.
Position the corkscrew in the center of the cork and twist in the spiral, turning it clockwise. Don’t twist it entirely into the cork—leave a bit of the spiral (the equivalent of one twist) showing.
Place the corkscrew’s first bottle rest onto the lip of the bottle, and lift up the handle to pull the cork halfway out. Then place the corkscrew’s second bottle rest on the lip of the bottle, and pull again until the cork is almost—but not quite—out.
At this point, the cork should be loosened enough that you can work it out of the bottle with your fingers.
For more detailed instructions, watch the video to the left.

| OPENING | POURING | STORING | READING LABELS | SERVING TEMPERATURE
SELECTING GLASSWARE | PAIRING WITH FOOD | WINE GLOSSARY (pdf) |
POURING A GLASS
Learning to properly pour a bottle of wine can help you impress your dinner guests, or, more likely, land a restaurant job waiting tables. Either way, it never hurts to have exquisite manners.
First, use a clean cloth napkin to wipe the mouth of the opened bottle, cleaning it of any cork dust or debris.
Cradle the bottle in one hand, and display the label to your fellow drinkers so they can see the maker, type, and year. If you are a waiter, display the bottle and label directly to the person who ordered it.
Bring the mouth of the bottle just above the rim of the glass, and pour.Only fill the glass about a third of the way up.
As you finish your pour, twist the bottle as you lift it away from the glass to prevent dripping and wipe the top of the bottle with the clean cloth napkin.
Place unfinished white wine bottles in a wine bucket with ice to keep them cool. If you are a waiter, be sure to ask if the guests would prefer the bottle of white on the table.

READING WINE LABELS
STORING WINE


IDEAL SERVING TEMPERATURES

SELECTING GLASSWARE
When the shelves at the chic little housewares boutique are lined with espresso spoons, cheese forks, and beer plates, it’s easy to think they are just trying to get another buck out of you.

On the other hand, sometimes these fancy tools for the trade make your food and drink experiences genuinely tastier. When it comes to using the right stemware for a particular type of wine, they’re not yanking your chain. The right glass absolutely brings out all the right stuff in the right wine. A good wine yearns to be adored for its looks, its smell, and its flavor and, therefore, holds so much delicious potential for the eyes, nose, and mouth.Professor Claus J. Riedel was the first glass designer to recognize that the bouquet, taste, balance and finish of wines are affected by the shape of the glass from which they are drunk.

The whole approach is not about correcting flaws in certain styles of wines, but of achieving balance in bringing out the distinct characteristics of each style of wine.To appreciate the beauty of wine, get glasses that are not colored or decoratively chiseled. It's hard to explain (with words) the difference between thin crystal and thick glass. You have to experience it to understand.
BASIC TIPS FOR SELECTING THE RIGHT GLASSWARE FOR RED WINES
The Bowl: Wider
The bigger flavors in reds need to spread out. The wider bowl also lets in more air, which releases bold aromas and flavors.

The Opening: Wider
Dip your nose into the wider bowl to get a load of more complex aromas.

Tip: When pouring wines, keep the wine level to the lower one-third the glass.
This leaves lots of air and swirl room, both of which enhance the enjoyment of your wines.

BIG REDS (Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz):
Get a big bowl and a big opening.

SOFT REDS (Pinot Noir, Merlot):
Get a big bowl that narrows a tinge at the opening.

BASIC TIPS FOR SELECTING THE RIGHT GLASSWARE FOR WHITE WINES
The Bowl: Narrower
The smaller capacity helps keep temperatures cool longer.

The Opening: Narrower
The lighter aromas waft well in a narrower glass.

SPIRITED WHITES (Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Chardonnay):
Get a bowl with a little room that narrows slightly at the opening.

DELICATE WHITES (Riesling, Pinot Gris, Gewurztiminer):
Get a narrow bowl and a narrow opening.

Hint: If you plan to serve several types of wine but don’t want to shell out the cash
for several types of glassware, buy the generic tulip-shaped wine glasses.
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FOOD PAIRINGS

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